Poetry

Book Excerpt: night thoughts

by Sarah Arvio

April 11, 2014 Sarah Arvio’s books include Visits from the Seventh; Sono: cantos; and night thoughts: 70 dream poems & notes from an analysis (all from Alfred A. Knopf). Arvio has won the Rome Prize of the American Academy of Arts & Letters, as well as Guggenheim, Bogliasco, and NEA fellowships. For many years a translator for the United Nations in New York and Switzerland, she now lives in Maryland near the Chesapeake Bay. Arvio will read from night thoughts at Burke’s Book Store in Memphis on April 17, 2014, at 5:30 p.m.

Published Friday, 11 April 2014

A Shared World

Eavan Boland talks with Chapter 16 about her new work, the definition of memoir, and poems as unfinished business

by Erica Wright

April 7, 2014 “Your poems may be in the past. Your faults are always in the future.” In this interview, Eavan Boland discusses her latest books, including A Journey with Two Maps, which blurs the boundaries of genre by combining memoir with literary criticism. On April 10, 2014, at 7 p.m., Boland will appear in Buttrick Hall on the Vanderbilt University campus in Nashville as part of the Vanderbilt Visiting Writers Series. The event is free and open to the public.

Published Monday, 7 April 2014

“Snow Day”

by John Bensko

April 3, 2014 Visitations by John Bensko, a professor of English at the University of Memphis, has been awarded the Anita Claire Scharf Award from the University of Tampa Press. Bensko will read from the newly released collection at the Jackson Madison County Library on April 3, 2014, at noon. The event is free and open to the public.

Published Thursday, 3 April 2014

“Teacher”

by Elizabeth Cox

March 21, 2014 Elizabeth Cox’s poems have appeared in The Southern Review, Southern Poetry Review, The Atlantic, and others. Her fiction has won the O’Henry Prize, the Robert Penn Warren Award, and the Lillian Smith Award. Cox grew up in Chattanooga and is a member of the Fellowship of Southern Writers. She will give the Landiss Lecture at Lipscomb University on March 27, 2014, at 7:30 p.m. A reception and book signing will follow. The event is free and open to the public.

Published Saturday, 22 March 2014

Profound Activities of the Mind

Prior to her Memphis appearance, Shakespearean scholar Marjorie Garber talks with Chapter 16 about the pleasures of reading and the value of the humanities

by Sean Kinch

March 20, 2014 Marjorie Garber believes that the way we read Shakespeare’s plays tells us as much about ourselves as it does about the Bard himself. In an interview with Chapter 16, Garber discusses her approach to Shakespeare, her love of literature, and her commitment to intellectual speculation. She will speak at Rhodes College in Memphis on March 27, 2014, at 7 p.m. Her talk, “Occupy Shakespeare: Shakespeare and/in the Humanities,” is free and open to the public.

Published Thursday, 20 March 2014

“After Hours, Provincetown Cemetery”

by Kendra DeColo

March 10, 2014 Kendra DeColo’s Thieves in the Afterlife was selected by Yusef Komunyakaa for the 2013 Saturnalia Books Poetry Prize. Her poems have appeared in Southern Indiana Review, Calyx, Best Indie Lit of New England, and elsewhere, and she has taught writing workshops in prisons, middle schools, and homeless shelters. DeColo will read from Thieves in the Afterlife at Parnassus Books in Nashville on March 12, 2014, at 6:30 p.m., and in Buttrick Hall, Room 102, on the Vanderbilt University campus in Nashville on March 20 at 7 p.m. Both events are free and open to the public.

Published Monday, 10 March 2014

“God’s Sound Check”

by R.B. Morris

February 28, 2014 R.B. Morris is a Knoxville poet, songwriter, solo performer, band leader, and a sometimes-playwright and actor. He has published books of poetry and music albums, and he wrote and acted in The Man Who Lives Here Is Loony, a one-man play taken from the life and work of writer James Agee. He was inducted into the East Tennessee Writers Hall of Fame in 2009. R.B. Morris will read from The Mockingbird Poems at the John C. Hodges Library Auditorium on the University of Tennessee campus in Knoxville on March 3, 2014, at 7 p.m. The reading is free and open to the public.

Published Friday, 28 February 2014

“Daffodils”

by Tom Lombardo

February 21, 2014 Former Knoxvillian Tom Lombardo is a poet, essayist, and freelance medical writer who lives in Midtown Atlanta. His poems have appeared in Southern Poetry Review, Ambit, Hampden-Sydney Poetry Review, and New York Quarterly, among others. He is the editor of an anthology, After Shocks: The Poetry of Recovery for Life Shattering Events, and is the poetry series editor for Press 53. His M.F.A. is from Queens University of Charlotte. Lombardo will read from What Bends Us Blue at Union Ave. Books in Knoxville on February 23, 2014, at 3 p.m.

Published Friday, 21 February 2014

“Hymn of Departures”

by Jeff Daniel Marion

February 13, 2014 Jeff Daniel Marion, a native of Rogersville, taught English and creative writing at Carson-Newman University for over thirty-five years. He has published nine poetry collections, four chapbooks, and a children’s book, Hello, Crow. On February 13, 2014, at 7:30 p.m., Marion will give a free public reading at the Paul Meek Library on the campus of the University of Tennessee in Martin.

Published Thursday, 13 February 2014

“Household Fire”

by Gary L. McDowell

January 31, 2014 Gary L. McDowell is the author of Weeping at a Stranger's Funeral (Dream Horse Press, 2014), American Amen (Dream Horse Press, 2010), and They Speak of Fruit (Cooper Dillon Books, 2009), and he is the co-editor of The Rose Metal Press Field Guide to Prose Poetry (Rose Metal Press, 2010). His poems and lyric essays are forthcoming in The Nation, Prairie Schooner, Quarter After Eight, and others. McDowell lives in Antioch, Tennessee, and is an assistant professor of English at Belmont University in Nashville. On January 31, 2014, at 7 p.m. he will appear—along with poets TJ Jarrett and Jeff Hardin—at Barnes & Noble Vanderbilt in Nashville. The event, part of the Lyrical Brew reading series, is free and open to the public.

Published Friday, 31 January 2014

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