Features

Each the Other’s World Entire

Novelist Beverly Lowry looks back at Cormac McCarthy’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, The Road, on its tenth anniversary

by Beverly Lowry

June 24, 2016 In the sixth of a ten-essay series commemorating the centennial year of the Pulitzer Prizes, Memphis native Beverly Lowry celebrates the narrative voice and original prose in Cormac McCarthy’s The Road, which won the Pulitzer Prize in 2007.

Published Friday, 24 June 2016

Another Realm of Being

Novelist Ed Tarkington reflects on the deep ambivalence that lies at the heart of Peter Taylor’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, A Summons to Memphis

by Ed Tarkington

June 17, 2016 In the fifth of a ten-essay series commemorating the centennial year of the Pulitzer Prizes, novelist Ed Tarkington considers the problematic culture depicted in Peter Taylor’s A Summons to Memphis, which won the Pulitzer Prize in 1987.

Published Friday, 17 June 2016

Reconsidering My Whole Position

Robert Penn Warren’s Pulitzer Prize-winning poems finally allowed Kate Daniels to call herself a Southern writer

by Kate Daniels

June 10, 2016 Robert Penn Warren is the only writer to have won a Pulitzer Prize in both poetry and fiction—and he won for poetry twice: in 1958 for Promises: Poems and in 1979 for Now and Then: Poems. In the fifth of a ten-essay series commemorating the centennial year of the Pulitzer Prizes, poet Kate Daniels remembers the way Warren’s poetry helped her confront an ugly past.

Published Friday, 10 June 2016

In a Dark Wood

Novelist Adam Ross first opened the closet of adult secrets through the plays of Tennessee Williams, who won a Pulitzer Prize for both A Streetcar Named Desire and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof

by Adam Ross

June 3, 2016 In the fourth of a ten-essay series commemorating the centennial year of the Pulitzer Prizes, novelist Adam Ross considers the lasting legacy of Tennessee Williams’s two Pulitzer-winning plays, A Streetcar Named Desire and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof.

Published Friday, 3 June 2016

Home Country

Novelist Amy Greene reflects on James Agee’s effort in A Death in the Family to tell something true in fiction

by Amy Greene

May 27, 2016 In the third of a ten-essay series commemorating the centennial year of the Pulitzer Prizes, novelist Amy Greene reflects on the lasting legacy of James Agee’s A Death in the Family, which won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1958, three years after Agee’s own death.

Published Friday, 27 May 2016

Praise Song

On the fortieth anniversary of the publication of Roots, poet Nikki Giovanni remembers the hope Alex Haley offered at a perilous time

by Nikki Giovanni

May 20, 2016 In the second of a ten-essay series commemorating the centennial year of the Pulitzer Prizes, poet Nikki Giovanni reflects on the enduring legacy of Alex Haley’s Roots, which won the Pulitzer Prize in 1977.

Published Friday, 20 May 2016

An Antidote to Political Venom

For Congressman Jim Cooper, the cure to this year’s political demagoguery is a good dose of Robert Penn Warren’s All the King’s Men

by Jim Cooper

May 13, 2016 In the first of a ten-essay series commemorating the centennial year of the Pulitzer Prizes, U.S. Representative Jim Cooper reflects on the political relevance of Robert Penn Warren’s All the King’s Men, which won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1947.

Published Friday, 13 May 2016

Kicking and Punching and Straining for the Sky

Jim Ridley—Nashville Scene editor and passionate champion of literature—died on Friday at age fifty

by Margaret Renkl

April 10, 2016 Jim Ridley’s love for Middle Tennessee, especially the arts in Middle Tennessee, was innate, lifelong, and absolutely unwavering. His death on April 8, 2016, left a hole this community will never fill.

Published Sunday, 10 April 2016

Young Magic

From the stage to the page, Nashville’s first Youth Poet Laureate shines

by Erica Ciccarone

March 28, 2016 Lagnajita Mukhopadhyay, Nashville’s first Youth Poet Laureate, has just published her debut collection. this is our war sparkles with imagery and wisdom that will stay with you long after you close the book. Mukhopadhyay will read from it at Parnassus Books in Nashville on April 1, 2016, at 6 p.m.

Published Monday, 28 March 2016

I Worry

A primer on what can go wrong in writing a novel

by Susannah Felts

March 11, 2016 I worry that I’ll never finish. I worry that I’ll finish a draft and never revise it. I worry that I’ll finish the book and no agent will pick it up. I worry that an agent will pick it up and fail to sell it and then dump me. I worry that it will sell and get bad reviews. I worry that it will sell and get no reviews. I worry—

Published Friday, 11 March 2016

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