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Chapter 16 is a digital language & literature program of Humanities Tennessee

Executive Director:
Tim Henderson

Director of Literature & Language Programs:
Serenity Gerbman

Editor:
Margaret Renkl

Copyeditor:
Wayne Christeson

Photography Editor:
Mary Emily Vatt

Contributing Writers: Tracy Barrett, Ralph Bowden, Maria Browning, Emily Choate, Julie Danielson, Susannah Felts, Randy Fox, Liz Garrigan, Aram Goudsouzian, Faye Jones, Sean Kinch, Peter Kuryla, Tina LoTufo, Paul McCoy, Sarah Norris, Charlotte Pence, Lyda Phillips, Clay Risen, Chris Scott, Ed Tarkington, Michael Ray Taylor, Stephen Usery, Beth Waltemath, Nicki Pendleton Wood, Erica Wright

Sponsored in part by:




A Word’s Weight

A writer once called his Sunday School teacher the worst name he could think of—and it haunts him still

by Hadley Hury

April 29, 2016 In 1957, when I was eight years old, I called my Sunday School teacher, Miss Jeffie Lou Beecroft, a bad word. I didn’t call her the bad word to her face, but it was a very bad word, apparently the worst word I had in me at the time, and that’s what has mattered ever since.

Published Friday, 29 April 2016

The Art of Attention

A new essay collection from the University of Tennessee honors Jeff Daniel Marion, beloved Appalachian poet and teacher

by Sarah Norris

April 28, 2016 Jeff Daniel Marion: Poet on the Holston celebrates the life and work of Appalachian poet Jeff Daniel Marion. Edited by Jesse Graves, Thomas Alan Holmes, and Ernest Lee, the anthology contains seventeen essays—including an autobiographical essay by Marion himself—an interview with the poet, and a detailed timeline of his life.

Published Thursday, 28 April 2016

Join the Invaders

Shirletta J. Kinchen’s Black Power in the Bluff City explores the history of student activism in Memphis

by Lyda Phillips

April 27, 2016 Shirletta Kinchen’s Black Power in the Bluff City examines the way black youth in Memphis played a pivotal role in creating societal change, both before and after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. at the Lorraine Hotel in 1968. In the end, the struggle for equality became a children’s crusade, with high-school and college students leading the way.

Published Wednesday, 27 April 2016

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